topic
Women as Leaders

Introduced: November 01 2011

Our discussion includes leaders such as Margaret Thatcher and Hillary Clinton and began with a Weigh-In on Michele Bachmann and then a Weigh-In on Sarah Palin. IWD also asked "What woman would you like to see considered for President or Vice President in 2012?" Who do you think is a future up-and-comer? Have past leaders opened our eyes about the potential for female leadership? What forces do you think work for and against a woman in U.S. Politics? How much do you care about having a woman as President?



Note from IWD about Women at the Top: There are currently 20 countries who have women as their top leadeer: Ireland, Finland, Germany, Liberia, India, Argentina, Bangledesh, Iceland, Croatia, Lithuania, Krygyzstan, Costa Rica, Trinidad and Tobago, Australia, Slovakia, Brazil, Switzerland, Peru, Kosovo, and Thailand. 


 

Dialogue on Women as Leaders
007:

I think it's embarrassing that the U.S., supposedly at the forefront of civil liberties around the world, is so far behind other countries on this issue. Women have even emerged as the leaders of countries where women face more oppression than in the U.S., like Liberia, Bangladesh, and Paskistan (former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto). How do you think those women managed to rise above the prejudices to rally enough support to be elected? It both mystifies and impresses me.


My favorite female leader to follow has been Yulia Tymoshenko (former Prime Minister of Ukraine and one of the leaders of the Orange Revolution). I've always found her courage and leadership inspiring. She's currently in prison for what the U.S. and E.U. are calling "selective prosecution of political opponents."



Note from IWD: Next week, IWD's Founder will describe some other women leaders from around the world who were honored at the 2012 International Women of Courage Awards on International Women's Day.

042:

“She is the real deal!” That’s what Meryl Streep said as she introduced Hillary Clinton in New York in early March and thanked her for her work with and for women all over the world. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECNQDqMoAjw%20

244:

If you didn’t see this in the New York Times, it’s worth taking a look. Columnist Maureen Dowd wrote, “American women have suddenly realized that their emancipation in the 21st century is not as secure as they had assumed.” She quotes Hillary Clinton as speaking up for women at the Women in the World Summit regarding various recent incidents in domestic politics. “’Yes,’ she (Clinton) continued to applause, ‘it is hard to believe that even here at home, we have to stand up for women’s rights and reject efforts to marginalize any one of us, because America needs to set an example for the entire world.’” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/dowd-dont-tread-on-us.html

097:

Looks as though the British monarchy is eager to move forward in opening opportunities for women leaders. They changed the law to permit whoever is Will and Kate’s heir – male or female – to be in line for the throne.

050:

Looking at the list of countries that have female leaders, I was surprised that some countries that seem so backward are not backward in this way.

251:

Sometimes the simplest things can make a lightbulb go on. I remember once looking at a ruler one of my kids had with all the U.S. presidents on it. Looking at that whole row of men, it seemed incredible that ALL of them were “more qualified” throughout all the years than any woman.

129:

The woman I’d like to see run in 2012 is the same woman who ran in 2008. Now, she is even more qualified with her experience as Secretary of State. I’ve read that Hillary Clinton is the most popular member of the Obama administration – popular with the American public.

114:

At this point in time, it's not about gender in electing someone to the highest office in our country, but rather to find the most competent leader and elect her/him to office. There are many competent women in politics and hopefully, they will rise to their highest potential and run for office in town/city, state, and national levels. It's time to judge everyone individually, as simplistic as that may sound.

091:

I don't see any woman as a serious candidate for President of the U.S. I would have much preferred Hillary to what we got but hindsight is 20/20. Women are hampered by "the good old boy" network of money and influence in the U.S. And perhaps most women aren't willing to put themselves into the dirty politics that she would face as a candidate. Some don't even want their husbands subjected to that scene.

053:

A Must Read: “The Hillary Moment,” an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal by Patrick Caddell and Douglas Schoen. It begins: When Harry Truman and Lyndon Johnson accepted the reality that they could not effectively govern the nation if they sought re-election to the White House, both men took the moral high ground and decided against running for a new term as president. President Obama is facing a similar reality—and he must reach the same conclusion. He should abandon his candidacy for re-election in favor of a clear alternative, one capable not only of saving the Democratic Party, but more important, of governing effectively and in a way that preserves the most important of the president's accomplishments. He should step aside for the one candidate who would become, by acclamation, the nominee of the Democratic Party: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. To read more, copy and paste in your browser http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203611404577041950781477944.html

105:

After watching and reading recent interviews with Condoleezza Rice, I have a new appreciation for her. I was never a big fan during the years she was Secretary of State (I honestly lumped her together with my distrust of Cheney and Rumsfeld) but I now think I see what she was dealing with. On TV the other day, I heard her say as advice to young people, “You can’t wait for role models that look like you.” She was a young black woman, her role models were old white men. She also said that although Rumsfeld had been a champion of her career in the early years, he had trouble seeing her as a peer and once told her she was “bright,” which she saw as patronizing.



Note from IWD: Relevant Reading: Condoleezza Rice’s memoir “No Higher Honor”

187:

When I think of really classic female heads of government, I think of Margaret Thatcher. She was a controversial figure but her tough stand on the Soviet Union showed a woman could be a strong figure of authority and she led Britain through an economic crisis.

Note from IWD: Relevant Viewing: Meryl Streep portrays Margaret Thatcher in the film “The Iron Lady” scheduled for release on December 30, 2011. Thatcher served as the U.K.’s Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990, the only woman PM in U.K. history.


Additional update: Meryl Streep won the Academy Award for her portrayal of Margaret Thatcher in this film.

007:

I think it's embarrassing that the U.S., supposedly at the forefront of civil liberties around the world, is so far behind other countries on this issue. Women have even emerged as the leaders of countries where women face more oppression than in the U.S., like Liberia, Bangladesh, and Paskistan (former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto). How do you think those women managed to rise above the prejudices to rally enough support to be elected? It both mystifies and impresses me.


My favorite female leader to follow has been Yulia Tymoshenko (former Prime Minister of Ukraine and one of the leaders of the Orange Revolution). I've always found her courage and leadership inspiring. She's currently in prison for what the U.S. and E.U. are calling "selective prosecution of political opponents."



Note from IWD: Next week, IWD's Founder will describe some other women leaders from around the world who were honored at the 2012 International Women of Courage Awards on International Women's Day.

042:

“She is the real deal!” That’s what Meryl Streep said as she introduced Hillary Clinton in New York in early March and thanked her for her work with and for women all over the world. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECNQDqMoAjw%20

244:

If you didn’t see this in the New York Times, it’s worth taking a look. Columnist Maureen Dowd wrote, “American women have suddenly realized that their emancipation in the 21st century is not as secure as they had assumed.” She quotes Hillary Clinton as speaking up for women at the Women in the World Summit regarding various recent incidents in domestic politics. “’Yes,’ she (Clinton) continued to applause, ‘it is hard to believe that even here at home, we have to stand up for women’s rights and reject efforts to marginalize any one of us, because America needs to set an example for the entire world.’” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/dowd-dont-tread-on-us.html

097:

Looks as though the British monarchy is eager to move forward in opening opportunities for women leaders. They changed the law to permit whoever is Will and Kate’s heir – male or female – to be in line for the throne.

050:

Looking at the list of countries that have female leaders, I was surprised that some countries that seem so backward are not backward in this way.

251:

Sometimes the simplest things can make a lightbulb go on. I remember once looking at a ruler one of my kids had with all the U.S. presidents on it. Looking at that whole row of men, it seemed incredible that ALL of them were “more qualified” throughout all the years than any woman.

129:

The woman I’d like to see run in 2012 is the same woman who ran in 2008. Now, she is even more qualified with her experience as Secretary of State. I’ve read that Hillary Clinton is the most popular member of the Obama administration – popular with the American public.

114:

At this point in time, it's not about gender in electing someone to the highest office in our country, but rather to find the most competent leader and elect her/him to office. There are many competent women in politics and hopefully, they will rise to their highest potential and run for office in town/city, state, and national levels. It's time to judge everyone individually, as simplistic as that may sound.

091:

I don't see any woman as a serious candidate for President of the U.S. I would have much preferred Hillary to what we got but hindsight is 20/20. Women are hampered by "the good old boy" network of money and influence in the U.S. And perhaps most women aren't willing to put themselves into the dirty politics that she would face as a candidate. Some don't even want their husbands subjected to that scene.

053:

A Must Read: “The Hillary Moment,” an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal by Patrick Caddell and Douglas Schoen. It begins: When Harry Truman and Lyndon Johnson accepted the reality that they could not effectively govern the nation if they sought re-election to the White House, both men took the moral high ground and decided against running for a new term as president. President Obama is facing a similar reality—and he must reach the same conclusion. He should abandon his candidacy for re-election in favor of a clear alternative, one capable not only of saving the Democratic Party, but more important, of governing effectively and in a way that preserves the most important of the president's accomplishments. He should step aside for the one candidate who would become, by acclamation, the nominee of the Democratic Party: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. To read more, copy and paste in your browser http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203611404577041950781477944.html

105:

After watching and reading recent interviews with Condoleezza Rice, I have a new appreciation for her. I was never a big fan during the years she was Secretary of State (I honestly lumped her together with my distrust of Cheney and Rumsfeld) but I now think I see what she was dealing with. On TV the other day, I heard her say as advice to young people, “You can’t wait for role models that look like you.” She was a young black woman, her role models were old white men. She also said that although Rumsfeld had been a champion of her career in the early years, he had trouble seeing her as a peer and once told her she was “bright,” which she saw as patronizing.



Note from IWD: Relevant Reading: Condoleezza Rice’s memoir “No Higher Honor”

187:

When I think of really classic female heads of government, I think of Margaret Thatcher. She was a controversial figure but her tough stand on the Soviet Union showed a woman could be a strong figure of authority and she led Britain through an economic crisis.

Note from IWD: Relevant Viewing: Meryl Streep portrays Margaret Thatcher in the film “The Iron Lady” scheduled for release on December 30, 2011. Thatcher served as the U.K.’s Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990, the only woman PM in U.K. history.


Additional update: Meryl Streep won the Academy Award for her portrayal of Margaret Thatcher in this film.

187:

When I think of really classic female heads of government, I think of Margaret Thatcher. She was a controversial figure but her tough stand on the Soviet Union showed a woman could be a strong figure of authority and she led Britain through an economic crisis.

Note from IWD: Relevant Viewing: Meryl Streep portrays Margaret Thatcher in the film “The Iron Lady” scheduled for release on December 30, 2011. Thatcher served as the U.K.’s Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990, the only woman PM in U.K. history.


Additional update: Meryl Streep won the Academy Award for her portrayal of Margaret Thatcher in this film.

105:

After watching and reading recent interviews with Condoleezza Rice, I have a new appreciation for her. I was never a big fan during the years she was Secretary of State (I honestly lumped her together with my distrust of Cheney and Rumsfeld) but I now think I see what she was dealing with. On TV the other day, I heard her say as advice to young people, “You can’t wait for role models that look like you.” She was a young black woman, her role models were old white men. She also said that although Rumsfeld had been a champion of her career in the early years, he had trouble seeing her as a peer and once told her she was “bright,” which she saw as patronizing.



Note from IWD: Relevant Reading: Condoleezza Rice’s memoir “No Higher Honor”

053:

A Must Read: “The Hillary Moment,” an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal by Patrick Caddell and Douglas Schoen. It begins: When Harry Truman and Lyndon Johnson accepted the reality that they could not effectively govern the nation if they sought re-election to the White House, both men took the moral high ground and decided against running for a new term as president. President Obama is facing a similar reality—and he must reach the same conclusion. He should abandon his candidacy for re-election in favor of a clear alternative, one capable not only of saving the Democratic Party, but more important, of governing effectively and in a way that preserves the most important of the president's accomplishments. He should step aside for the one candidate who would become, by acclamation, the nominee of the Democratic Party: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. To read more, copy and paste in your browser http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203611404577041950781477944.html

091:

I don't see any woman as a serious candidate for President of the U.S. I would have much preferred Hillary to what we got but hindsight is 20/20. Women are hampered by "the good old boy" network of money and influence in the U.S. And perhaps most women aren't willing to put themselves into the dirty politics that she would face as a candidate. Some don't even want their husbands subjected to that scene.

114:

At this point in time, it's not about gender in electing someone to the highest office in our country, but rather to find the most competent leader and elect her/him to office. There are many competent women in politics and hopefully, they will rise to their highest potential and run for office in town/city, state, and national levels. It's time to judge everyone individually, as simplistic as that may sound.

129:

The woman I’d like to see run in 2012 is the same woman who ran in 2008. Now, she is even more qualified with her experience as Secretary of State. I’ve read that Hillary Clinton is the most popular member of the Obama administration – popular with the American public.

251:

Sometimes the simplest things can make a lightbulb go on. I remember once looking at a ruler one of my kids had with all the U.S. presidents on it. Looking at that whole row of men, it seemed incredible that ALL of them were “more qualified” throughout all the years than any woman.

050:

Looking at the list of countries that have female leaders, I was surprised that some countries that seem so backward are not backward in this way.

097:

Looks as though the British monarchy is eager to move forward in opening opportunities for women leaders. They changed the law to permit whoever is Will and Kate’s heir – male or female – to be in line for the throne.

244:

If you didn’t see this in the New York Times, it’s worth taking a look. Columnist Maureen Dowd wrote, “American women have suddenly realized that their emancipation in the 21st century is not as secure as they had assumed.” She quotes Hillary Clinton as speaking up for women at the Women in the World Summit regarding various recent incidents in domestic politics. “’Yes,’ she (Clinton) continued to applause, ‘it is hard to believe that even here at home, we have to stand up for women’s rights and reject efforts to marginalize any one of us, because America needs to set an example for the entire world.’” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/dowd-dont-tread-on-us.html

042:

“She is the real deal!” That’s what Meryl Streep said as she introduced Hillary Clinton in New York in early March and thanked her for her work with and for women all over the world. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECNQDqMoAjw%20

007:

I think it's embarrassing that the U.S., supposedly at the forefront of civil liberties around the world, is so far behind other countries on this issue. Women have even emerged as the leaders of countries where women face more oppression than in the U.S., like Liberia, Bangladesh, and Paskistan (former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto). How do you think those women managed to rise above the prejudices to rally enough support to be elected? It both mystifies and impresses me.


My favorite female leader to follow has been Yulia Tymoshenko (former Prime Minister of Ukraine and one of the leaders of the Orange Revolution). I've always found her courage and leadership inspiring. She's currently in prison for what the U.S. and E.U. are calling "selective prosecution of political opponents."



Note from IWD: Next week, IWD's Founder will describe some other women leaders from around the world who were honored at the 2012 International Women of Courage Awards on International Women's Day.

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